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Baby boom to add more pressure on primary school places in Lincolnshire

By Boston Target  |  Posted: January 24, 2012

Baby boom
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ONE in six primary schools in Lincolnshire is oversubscri- bed – with forecasts predicting another 3,000 pupils needing places in the next four years.

A baby boom is set to see an extra 3,007 primary school pupils by 2016.

But with Department for Education figure showing that almost 6,856 primary school places went unfilled last year, the county should be able to accommodate the additional number on paper at least.

Schools minister Lord Hill said: "We're dealing with the impact of soaring birth rates on primary schools – more than doubling targeted investment at areas facing the greatest pressure on numbers to over £4 billion in the next four years.

"We are building Free Schools and letting the most popular schools expand to meet demand from parents."

The news came as the Government released its latest figures on school capacity - including local authority forecasts for how demand for places is set to change between the school years 2010-2011 and 2015-2016.

It shows a forecast increase in primary-age children in Lincolnshire from 49,156 in 2010/11 to 52,163 in 2015/16 – a rise of 3,007 pupils.

Figures show that 42 of the 275 primary schools were full or over capacity last year, while 233 were under-subscribed with 6,856 spare places.

The number of secondary school pupils in North Lincolnshire is set to drop by 5,487 from 48,902 in 2010/11 to 43,415 in 2017/18.

Last year, 21 of the 58 secondary schools in the county was full over overcapacity, while the remaining 37 had a total of 3,601 spare places.

The figures come against a background of spending cutbacks and growing numbers of schools becoming academies and so moving outside the control of local education authorities, which have a statutory duty to provide places for children.

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